The Popular 90s Rave Scene: Learn What Happened

Over time, the 90s rave scene began to develop different sub-genres of electronic music and different styles of parties, leading to a split in the scene.

One of the earliest splits in the rave scene occurred in the early 1990s. At this time ravers began to embrace a harder, more aggressive form of dance music known as hardcore.

The hardcore rave genre emerged from the early UK rave scene in the early 1990s and is characterized by fast tempos, heavy basslines, and aggressive sounds.

There are several sub-genres of hardcore rave music, each with its own unique sound and style. Its popularity later consisted of an international audience of various hardcore genres. Here are a few of the most popular:

Breakbeat Hardcore

This sub-genre of hardcore rave music features breakbeats, heavy basslines, and chopped-up vocal samples. This was one of the earliest forms of hardcore rave music and helped to define the sound of the UK 90s rave scene.

Happy Hardcore

Happy Hardcore is a more upbeat and energetic form of hardcore rave music that emerged in the mid-1990s. The genre is characterized by fast tempos, high-pitched vocals, and uplifting melodies.

Gabber

Gabber is a form of hardcore rave music that originated in the Netherlands in the early 1990s. It is characterized by extremely fast tempos, distorted basslines, and aggressive sounds.

Speedcore

Speedcore is a sub-genre of hardcore rave music that emerged in the mid-1990s. It’s characterized by extremely fast tempos, often exceeding 300 beats per minute and aggressive sounds.

Terrorcore

Terrorcore is a form of hardcore rave music that emerged in the late 1990s. It is characterized by its aggressive, industrial sound and often features dark vocal samples.

The popular hardcore scene helped to define the sound of the UK rave scene and the global hardcore rave scene during the 1990s and beyond. Although the scene split it’s obvious that its routes are Uk based.

Commercialization And Mainstreaming

Some ravers began to embrace a harder, more aggressive form of dance music while others began to reject the commercialization and mainstreaming of the scene.

The 90s rave scene was characterized by a sense of freedom and experimentation, as young people gathered together to dance, socialize, and explore new forms of music and culture.

The Music & The Community

Event organizers held smaller, more underground parties with a focus on the music and the community. This meant a more personal way to express on the dancefloor with real ravers away from the mainstream.

Regular ravers began to reject the commercialization and mainstreaming to unite with less authoritative power from the police and media. It was common to learn at the last minute where and when the event was to be held.

While the 90s rave scene eventually began to fade away, its impact on music and culture can still be felt today. Many sub-genres and styles of electronic music that emerged during that era continue to thrive and evolve today.

The Vocal Rave Tunes Of 1991

The Popular 90s Rave Scene: Learn What Happened
The Popular 90s Rave Scene: Learn What Happened

The vocal rave tunes of 1991 included many classic tracks that helped define the early sound of the 90s rave scene in the UK. Here are some of the most popular vocal rave tunes of 1991 included:

Pacific State By 808 State

Pacific State was an instrumental track that featured a prominent saxophone sample and a lush, atmospheric sound that helped define the ambient house sub-genre of electronic music.

Charly By The Prodigy

Charly was a breakout hit by The Prodigy and featured a sample from a children’s TV show, as well as Aggressive Breakbeats and a catchy vocal hook.

This tune started several other vocal children’s theme tunes that followed. The Prodigy reframed from mixing other children’s theme tunes due to the licensing laws expressed to them.

Sweet Harmony By Liquid

Sweet Harmony was a classic example of the early UK rave sound, with its uplifting piano melody, soulful vocals, and breakbeats.

Playing With Knives By Bizarre Inc

Playing with Knives featured a catchy vocal hook and a driving bassline and helped establish the breakbeat hardcore sub-genre of electronic music.

Where Love Lives By Alison Limerick

Where Love Lives was a classic example of the early house sound, with its soulful vocals and uplifting piano riff.

These vocal rave tunes helped define the sound and energy of the early UK rave scene in 1991, and many of them remain popular with electronic music fans today.

The Rave Scene Split

Around 1994, the rave scene in the UK split into several different sub-genres of electronic music. Some of these genres included:

Jungle / Drum and Bass

This genre emerged from the breakbeat hardcore sound of the early 90s and was characterized by fast, syncopated breakbeats, heavy basslines, and chopped-up samples.

Jungle and Drum and Bass became one of the most popular sub-genres of electronic music in the UK and had a significant impact on the rave scene.

Trance

Trance music originated in Germany in the early 90s, but it quickly spread to the UK and became a popular sub-genre of rave music. Trance is characterized by its melodic, uplifting sound and is often associated with a sense of euphoria and transcendence.

Hard House

Hard House and Hard Trance are both sub-genres of electronic music that emerged in the mid-90s.

It was characterized by hard, driving beats and aggressive basslines, and is often associated with the harder, more energetic side of the rave scene.

The Hardcore Underground Spirit

As the electronic music scene began to shift towards more mainstream and commercial sounds, some fans felt that the hardcore rave genre was losing its authenticity and underground spirit.

However, there are still dedicated fans of the genre today, and many hardcore rave DJs and producers continue to create and perform music that stays true to the genre’s roots.

It’s sad to learn our routes for hardcore have taken a backseat compared to the 90s rave scene. The true aspect of what we believe in has now travelled the world.

The positivity that came out of a scene that dominated EDM, was a time when ravers smiled, danced and reminisced about each and every night.

It’s great to know the scene has now exploded worldwide and has many other nationalities learning not to make the same mistakes that occurred on the 90s rave scene in the UK.